The foot and ankle is a complex structure consisting of 28 bones and 30 joints that changes from being completely mobile when positioning the foot on the floor to a rigid closed pack position during propulsion such as when running or jumping. An understanding of this complex structure has largely been derived from cadaveric studies. In vivo studies have largely relied on skin surface markers and multi-camera systems that are unable to differentiate small motions between the bones of the foot. MRI and CT based studies have struggled to interpret functional weight bearing motion as imaging is largely static and non-load bearing. Arthritic diseases of the foot and ankle are treated either by fusion of the joints to remove motion, or joint replacement to retain motion. Until a better understanding of the biomechanics of these joints can be achieved.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Cone beam CT, Dynamic CT, Non-convex optimisation, PALM, iPALM, Optical flow regularisation, Variational methods
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2534827
Series Proceedings of SPIE
Conference International Meeting on Fully Three-Dimensional Image Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine
Citation
Djurabekova, N, Goldberg, A, Hauptmann, A, Hawkes, D, Long, G, Lucka, F, & Betcke, M. (2019). Application of Proximal Alternating Linearized Minimization (PALM) and inertial PALM to dynamic 3D CT. In Proceedings of the 15th International Meeting on Fully Three-Dimensional Image Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine. doi:10.1117/12.2534827