In September 2014, Miracle Theatre performed “the Tempest” simultaneously at two different locations to two separate audiences. Both audiences were linked together using an advanced video system, where several cameras captured the play. This is just one example of the radical shift in performing arts, where small theatre companies can use the Internet and a range of digital tools for reaching a wider remote audience. During the last years, we have explored how tele-presence has an effect on the performing arts, on the artists, and on the audiences. This position paper describes our journey, posing a number of questions.
Additional Metadata
THEME Information (theme 2)
Publisher University of Wisconsin--Madison
Stakeholder Unspecified
Project Video Communications for Networked Communities
Conference Workshop on Everyday Telepresence: Emerging Practices and Future Research Directions (in conjunction with the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems)
Citation
Cesar Garcia, P.S, Jansen, A.J, Geelhoed, E, Williams, D, Kegel, I, Ursu, M, & Wang, C. (2015). Distributed Theatre: Connecting (with) Remote Audiences. In Proceedings of Workshop on Everyday Telepresence: Emerging Practices and Future Research Directions (in conjunction with the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems) 2015 (0). University of Wisconsin--Madison.