Creating compelling multimedia content is a difficult task. It involves not only the creative process of developing a compelling media-based story, but it also requires significant technical support for content editing, management and distribution. This has been true for printed, audio and visual presentations for centuries. It is certainly true for broadcast media such as radio and television. A broadcast model of content distribution is based on maximizing the appeal of content while minimizing the "cost" per viewer. This "one size fits all" model has lost some of its appeal as more content distribution channels has developed and as an increased desire for content personalization has manifested itself. Simply put, modern content needs to be accompanied by an increased degree of personal interaction with that content. Several technologies have been developed to increase the degree of personal interaction with content. One of these is the secondary screen: a device that lets users select adjunct information or provide feedback to (and with) other content viewers. At present, the secondary screen helps viewers discuss content, but it provides only limited support for influencing content. This makes the secondary screen a transitional technology.
Additional Metadata
THEME Information (theme 2), Software (theme 1)
Publisher ACM
Stakeholder Unspecified
Conference ACM International Conference on Interactive Experiences for Television and Online Video
Citation
Bulterman, D.C.A. (2014). Interacting with third-party content: is a second screen enough?. In Proceedings of ACM International Conference on Interactive Experiences for Television and Online Video 2014 (ACM TVX 0) (pp. 1–2). ACM.